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Christmas campaign

Offer a Christmas present for Christians in Need

The videos we present to you are appeals to generosity, but they are also moments of gratitude where the people who benefited from your generosity thank you. And, as they say, we also say a hearty, Shukran, that is: Thank you!

This Christmas offer a Christmas present to our brothers and sisters in need

Lebanon

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For me, prayer is not reciting prayers. Prayer for me is talking to God about all these problems. Sometimes I offer people to Him. But, often, I ask Him questions. Why the injustice? Why all this suffering? I’m touched. There are times when I cry because of these problems. At the center, our first need to help the patients that come in is, first of all, medicines.
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My role is to have loved life in order to be able to give it to others. It is difficult because there is so much unemployment. No one is working. And how will people live then? A lot of people don’t eat meat anymore, who don’t eat fruit anymore, who don’t eat dairy products anymore … the children. How many times do mothers call me, “Sister Juliett, the fridge is empty.”
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Lebanon is a country that suffers. Our country is hung on the cross, waiting for the light of resurrection. Thus, it is necessary to help our Lebanese society to find its meaning in God. The dream that is inherent to the human person no longer exists. We need to be helped to know how to dream again.
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We asked the young people, “Why are you here?” They told us that after one day in the reality that they are living elsewhere, they await the time when they can come to the House of Pastoral Care. The difficulties become a little easier. Lebanese are a people who like to live, who like to dance, sing, to celebrate a lot.
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We are in need for medicine. Imagine people with behavioural problems, with hyperactivity, with no concentration. Imagine them without the medicine. Imagine yourself waking up with like your son putting a knife on your neck or burning all the place around. Imagine people with epilepsy, that they cannot have the medicine. Imagine how hard it’s going to be, the seizures on them.
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I have a challenge to find money at the end of the month, to pay for the teachers, for the fuel for the buses to make the buses go and bring the children. I don’t know at the end of the month if there is money to feed the poor students. We are not asking them for money. We are teaching them for free, we are providing food for them, we are providing food for their families.

This Christmas offer a Christmas present to our brothers and sisters in need

Syria

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During the war our financial situation deteriorated a lot. Before the war, I used to have my own car workshop. Today I have a job at a restaurant where I wash the dishes but because of inflation I cannot even buy food with my poor salary. So, most of the time I bring leftover food from the restaurant.
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Mari Al Beik and her daughter – members of the deaf and mute community in Our Lady of the Annunciation Church, Aleppo
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Now we don’t have food, only bread, and we are struggling. The Catholic Church is the main caretaker of our family. I have a great faith in God although the economic situation is deteriorating each day. I have a strong belief that God would never leave us alone or abandon us.
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We used to own a house with a big farm in our village. We had walnut and olive trees and we used to sell the harvest. Shadi was a lumberjack. We also used to own a small grocery shop. Then we lost everything because of the war. The bombs used to fall in the heart of the village, devastating schools, and houses. People were dying because of the bombs. So, we were forced to escape to save ourselves and our children.
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Since getting married, we built the habit to pray every morning and night and we attend mass every Sunday. And we experienced God’s presence through ACN’s support, which was a great surprise. In the Church we were told that ACN would be ready to support us as newlyweds. We were able to install a machine to regulate the electricity since the electricity in Syria isn’t stable and it can come in high voltages and damage the electronic devices or even cause a fire.
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‘‘My name is Majd. I am 12 years old. And I feel so proud of being a scout.’’ The scout leader for Majd unit reminds us: ‘‘Kids now in the post-war period are thirsty to live because they lived very tough 10 years and they were deprived of everything. And now, there is no place to play, there is no electricity and if they want to follow their dreams, it can’t be offered that. So, we are trying to offer that to them within our scouts gathering’’.

“I invite you together with Aid to the Church in Need to do works of mercy around the world.”
Pope Francis