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ACN International

 

Turkey – 100 projects in the last 20 years

02.12.2014 in ACN Canada, ACN International, ACN PROJECTS, ACN SPECIAL SERIES, Turkey

Even though Turkey´s Christian population is barely 0,3%, Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) has supported 100 projects in Turkey in the last twenty years

ACN International
Adapted by Amanda Bridget Griffin

A significant amount of ACN´s help has gone towards Iraqi and Syrian refugees in the Eastern part of the country. Since 2010 ACN donated a total of $182,600 to Iraqi refugees, mainly via the Chaldean Church and the Salesian Fathers in Istanbul. The Salesians look after families and are particularly concerned with ensuring that the children continue to receive a schooled education.

ACN has also helped Syrian refugees in Eastern Turkey, since the crisis in Syria began. From 2013  to 2014 ACN has donated a total of  $66,000 towards their needs.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

Other types of help given Turkey include the support of the Christian TV studio “SAT 7”, and the printing of the book by the German Jesuit and Islam expert, W. Troll S.J.  “Müslümanlar soruyor” “(Muslims Ask, Christians Answer”) – an inter-religious dialogue based on answering the questions on the Christian faith most frequently asked by Muslims. ACN also supported the installation of an internet homepage “Answers to Islam,”covering the same topic as the book.

Other examples of  ACN publication projects are the translation and printing of 3,000 copies of ACN´s Little Catechism, “I Believe” in Turkish and help with the  printing  of the Catechism for children in the Turkish language, entrusted to the Pauline Sisters.

Repairing church property, mainly churches and convents, has been an important part of our help both in the past and today.  Among these projects are several construction projects for the convent of the Daughters of Charity in Istanbul.  Another example is the restoration of the historical church -Santa Maria Kilisesi, Izmir, Smyrna (near Turkey´s Aegean coast) – one of the oldest churches to have withstood the destruction, and today cared for by Franciscan friars.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

Finally, ACN supports the work of different female congregations in various ways. One such example was provide water borehole and an elevator for the Little Sisters of the Poor, Istanbul (Fransiz Fakirhanesi) whose presence in Turkey goes back 120 years and who today run a home for the elderly and have also cared for refugees.

And with this, we invite you to help us… to help our brothers and sisters who will be much in need of your help.

To make a donation to ACN for refugees

To make a donation by please call: (514) 932-0552 or toll free 1-(800) 585-6333
or click the image to make a secure on-line donation.

The situation of African Catholic Migrants in Turkey

01.12.2014 in ACN Canada, ACN International, ACN PROJECTS, ACN SPECIAL SERIES, Turkey

“God brought me to Turkey to be on His Team!”

By Maria Lozano, ACN International

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

“I used to play football in a club in Nigeria. My manager told me that I was good and he gave me hope to find a team in Europe. He charged me $4000 for the process of playing in a club in Izmir, in Turkey.”This is how Pascal starts telling his story. However, right after landing in the Turkish land, he received a call from the manager: the contract had been canceled. With  a  threat of not coming back to Nigeria to ask for his money, because in this case he would make his life impossible to live, he recommended him to go to Istanbul. Pascal had never heard about Istanbul. He said to him, “this is a big city and you will find help.” It happened like this; Pascal found a Turkish citizen in the station who helped him to contact a soccer club. “God put this in my path, I am sure of it. I trained myself in that club but finally all this came to nothing,” says the player.

The young Nigerian has been in Turkey for three years. “Many promises but no results, only faith in God” he says. This has been the only support he found during this time: his Christian faith and trust in God. Regardless of all that has happened Pascal is convinced: “I came to Turkey with the intentions of playing football but God brought me here for another league. I have not played a single game with any club but I am playing a game which is more important: to give God`s testimony with my life and my actions. I had one plan, but God had other plans for me. God made me find another team. I have found a prayer group, my faith has grown, I pray every day and I give praise to Him for bringing me here.”

There are thousands of Africans in Turkey

The story of Pascal can be one, but it’s not, there are dozens like him. Young boys from Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon, and other African countries come here with lots of hope and dreams. Following the same fraudulent system, all were promised to find a football club for them; they pay huge amounts in their home countries. Most of them are helped by the support and efforts of the whole family and once they are here, they discover that this was all a farce.  Fr. Julius Ohnele, a Nigerian priest who is responsible for pastoral care of these immigrants in Istanbul, tells that the number of the players is so large that, with lot of hard work for the last five years, they organized a championship between the African players who have come from different countries: “The training and matches keep them busy and it’s healthy that they get training and keep themselves in form. Furthermore, we invite different football clubs to see them playing and through this work we have managed to place some players in clubs.”

The case of these players is just one specific case, but there are thousands of Africans in Turkey. “Some of them flee from the situation of war and violence in their own countries, for example Somalia, Eritrea and Congo. Others think that while living here, they will find a better life or a step closer to the neighboring countries. The geographic situation of Turkey makes it a place of transit for them, however the border with Greece is very controlled and in the end many of the immigrants get stuck, without money, without work, without hope. Many end with depression,” explains Fr. Julius.

The residence permit costs from $1000 to $3000 – depending on how long one had stayed as illegal migrant in the country – and it is only for six months. Finding a job is difficult and often they feel discriminated and disadvantaged in society. Some of them rely on occasional work for hire, which is also difficult to find and get very little to sustain themselves. Frequently they look for help from Fr. Julius, who he himself has almost nothing material to offer them except his prayers: “It is hard to get support or any assistance for them in Turkey, much more difficult than in other countries in Europe.”

“The prayer sustains us all”

To go back to their countries it is impossible for them, not only for the lack of money to pay the transportation. “My brothers prefer to die starving, without medical help and being humiliated, instead of going back to their homes to destroy the hopes that families have placed on them. In our own countries, they think that Europe is a land where they are going to find a better life and been able to help those who have been left in their countries. The families give out all that they have so that their child could go abroad; sometimes they borrow a big amount of money and bring themselves into debt. Going back home to admit that one has been deceived is unimaginable; better to die in misery than going back,” recounts Pascal.

“They all suffer a lot, many end up in prison. Others have tried to go to Greece with fatal results. Shortly, after arriving here in 2007, I lost some of my parishioners. I knew them, I had prayed with them. They all were drowned when the boat in which they went sank. That day I felt my heart was broken. Unfortunately, this is happening continuously,” tells Father Julius.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

The face a reality that is not easy for them in a country where 99.6% are Muslims. The catholic community is one of the few places where these “diaspora Africans” feel at home. Besides Mass in English on Sunday, Father Julius celebrates the African mass regularly, with its music and customs. “These meetings are a good opportunity to give them a message of hope, perseverance and encouragement. Many of them have seen strengthen their faith after suffering so many difficulties. There are rosary groups, charismatic groups. The prayer sustains us all. God is their hope,” concludes the priest.


 

Even though Turkey´s Christian population is barely 0.3%, Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) has supported 100 projects in Turkey in the last twenty years. 

A significant amount of ACN´s help has gone towards Iraqi and Syrian refugees in the eastern part of the country. Since 2010, ACN donated a total of $182,600 to Iraqi refugees, mainly via the Chaldean Church and the Salesian Fathers in Istanbul. The Salesians look after families and are particularly concerned to ensure that the children continue to receive a school education. ACN has also helped Syrian refugees in Eastern Turkey, since the onset of the Syrian crisis. From 2013 to 2014, ACN has donated a total of $66,000 – towards their most essential needs.

We invite you to continue visiting our blog – www.aidchurch.wordpress.com over the coming days to get more information on the subject and the situation effecting refugees in Turkey.


 

Tomorrow:  100 projects in the last 20 years

 

Journey with ACN – Iraq

28.11.2014 in ACN BENEFACTORS, ACN Canada, ACN International, ACN PROJECTS, Aid to refugees, Iraq, Journey with ACN

JOURNEY WITH ACN is  our weekly newsletter regularly posted to our blog and designed to acquaint you with the needs of the Catholic Church around the world – and various projects we have helped to bring into being together with ACN benefactors.

This week :  Iraq


 

Teaching the Faith, even in time of war

No matter how difficult life has been for Christians in Baghdad since 2003, the Church still strives by every possible means to keep on with the teaching of the Faith, and also to continue with her other work involving children and young people.

Now, above all, the local Church needs to feel part of the universal Church. This can be done best by passing on the eternal truths of the faith to the next generation – a generation that hopefully, will be able to make its own contribution in the future to a peaceful coexistence among all religions in Iraq.

Every Friday – the Muslim day of prayer – the various Christian communities provide religious instruction for the faithful. There are at least 20 large and small Chaldean communities involved in organizing such instruction. Many of their communities are situated in the most dangerous areas of the city – although at the same time, in the current instability, people are in danger everywhere and at all times in Baghdad.

Irak-3

To reduce the potential danger to children, both they and the catechists have to be collected safely from their homes by bus and brought to one of the eight larger and nine smaller centres, and driven home again afterward – keeping one such bus going costs anywhere between 150 and 300 dollars a month, depending on the size of the bus. This results in a total cost each year of 45,000 dollars for the parishes of Bagdad to deal with transport alone.

But money is also needed for the teaching materials and books. Here again the total cost to the parishes is around 5,000 dollars annually. The Christians of Iraq need all the help we can give them – especially now – if they are to remain in their own homeland and live their faith daily.

We were happy to promise a contribution of $53,600 for this project.  Now we are counting on your support to help us make good on our promise to these Iraqi parishes.

To make a donation to ACN for refugees

To make a donation by please call: (514) 932-0552 or toll free 1-(800) 585-6333
or click the image to make a secure on-line donation.

Journey with ACN : Kenya

21.11.2014 in ACN Canada, ACN International, ACN PROJECTS, Journey with ACN, Kenya

JOURNEY WITH ACN is  our weekly newsletter regularly posted to our blog and designed to acquaint you with the needs of the Catholic Church around the world – and various projects we have helped to bring into being together with ACN benefactors.

This week :  Kenya


 

“We can only celebrate Mass here once every three months”

By ACN International
Adapted by ACN Canada
A car for the pastoral work in the Catholic parish of Mbara in KitaleThe parish of Christ the King in Mbara is one of 28 parishes in the diocese of Kitale. It is extremely isolated and can only be reached by rough tracks, since there are no properly constructed roads. In fact, in bad weather it is impossible to navigate these roads safely – a fact that Father Bertrand knows only too well.

The infrastructure in Mbara is inadequate, to say the least. “There is no healthcare provision, no communications network, no road system and no electricity. All the villagers depend on the priest for their basic necessities. It takes me four hours to reach the town. Only a vehicle with four-wheel-drive can cope with the steep track leading to the town,” writes Father Bertrand W Kundu, the parish priest in a letter to ACN.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

For the moment, Father Bertrand uses a small Japanese car that has already seen many years of service. His is actually the only car that can be found anywhere around! Mbara has a population of 15,000 – and not one of them has a car! Only once every three months do the 2,000 Catholics in the town have the privilege of attending Holy Mass because it is so difficult for Father Bertrand to get to them. He is also very much involved in the important peace work of the Catholic Church in Kenya, which has set up a network with other parishes close to the border, in Uganda, Sudan and Ethiopia.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

ACN is hoping to help Father Bertrand with a contribution of $32,450 in order to provide him with a strong, solid and reliable vehicle so he can reach the faithful and share the Good News!

Our question is: Can you help us, help him?

 

To make a donation to ACN for refugees

To make a donation by please call: (514) 932-0552 or toll free 1-(800) 585-6333
or click the image to make a secure on-line donation.

PRESS RELEASE: Jordan – Aid to the Church in Need supports Christian refugees from Iraq

11.11.2014 in ACN Canada, ACN International, Aid to refugees, Emergency Aid, Persecution of Christians
To make a donation to ACN for refugees

To make a donation by please call: (514) 932-0552 or toll free 1-(800) 585-6333
or click the image to make a secure on-line donation.

Oliver Maksan, ACN International

Adapted by Robert Lalonde, ACN Canada 

Montreal, Tuesday, November 11th, 2014 – The Catholic pastoral charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) has allocated $77 500 of humanitarian aid for Christian refugees from Iraq. This will support about 200 families from the Mosul region who have been taken in by the Catholic parish “Mary, Mother of the Church” in Amman (Jordan).

Jordanie-2

Parish priest Khalil Jaar said to Aid to the Church in Need: “The people arrived here with nothing. They therefore urgently need anything that could in any way be useful, such as shoes, clothing, blankets and medicine. Daily meals also need to be provided for about 200 families. No one can say for how many days or months they will be living in our parish.”

King Abdullah II condemn violence

According to Father Jaar, the families are no longer only living in the common rooms of the rectory; some have in the meantime been moved to flats the parish has rented in the surrounding area. “We are still taking in new arrivals every day. We have started renting small flats close to our church. We are housing at least two families in each of these because the rental costs are very high.”

Jordanie-1

In addition to meeting everyday necessities, the parish is also caring for the psychological needs of the children and their parents as well as organising discussion groups and prayer meetings, Father Jaar said. He explained that the Christians who fled Mosul to escape the militias of the “Islamic State” have experienced terrible things. “In the summer,” the priest continued, “the Muslim extremists who conquered Mosul gave Christians the choice of either converting to Islam, paying a tax or risk being executed. The result was a mass exodus of Christians to the semi-autonomous region of Kurdistan. A man told me how they were inspected at an ISIS checkpoint as they fled Mosul. Everything was taken from them, money, passports, jewellery and watches. Their three-year-old son was not even allowed to take his milk bottle with him.”Jordanie-3

According to Father Jaar, King Abdullah II of Jordan has reacted to the persecution by allowing many of the Christians from Mosul to stay in his country. “The king has proclaimed his sympathy and his support for the persecuted groups and has condemned the violent acts of the ISIS as not Islamic.”

Aid to the Church in Need supports the Christians suffering from ISIS terror both inside and outside of Iraq. The pastoral charity recently granted 5,77 million dollars of emergency aid to internally displaced Christians in Iraq, one of the largest individual programmes in the charity’s history.

 

Journey with ACN – Mexico

07.11.2014 in ACN BENEFACTORS, ACN Canada, ACN International, ACN PROJECTS, CONSTRUCTION, Journey with ACN, Mexico, Sisters

 JOURNEY WITH ACN is  our weekly newsletter regularly posted to our blog and designed to acquaint you with the needs of the Catholic Church around the world – and various projects we have helped to bring into being together with ACN benefactors.

This week :  Mexico


Help for the contemplative Poor Clare Sisters in Madera

By ACN International

“It is with great joy that we are able to inform you that, thanks to the grace of God and the generosity of people such as you, work is now almost finished on the construction of our convent of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in the diocese of Cuauhtémoc-Madera.Many, many thanks to the benefactors of ACN! May God reward them!” So runs the letter from the prioress of the Poor Clares, Sister Elena Salas Nieto, thanking ACN for supporting the construction of this convent – a task begun in 2005 and which is expected to be finally completed this year.

Mexico-ACN-20140708-11218

© Aid to the Church in Need

 

For 27 years the sisters lived in an old building, until ACN agreed to help them for the construction of a new convent. Over the past years one section has been built at a time – convent enclosure, refectory, dayroom and chapel – and now the guesthouse is the last thing to be completed. Still needed here are the kitchen and two communal rooms.

The Sisters are eagerly looking forward to the completion of their convent. It is of great importance, not only for them but also for the entire local area, since their presence helps to create a “climate of solitude and silence” which is indispensable for the contemplative style of living, as Sister Elena explains. “It is also very important for priests, religious and ordinary laypeople who are searching for an intimate personal encounter with God,” she adds.

Mexico-20051013_003

© Aid to the Church in Need

Once the guesthouse is completed, visitors can be welcomed who are searching for God and for meaning in their lives. Already, however, the convent is a place of sanctuary, sought out by many people who come here with their “everyday concerns, such as hunger, war, prison, persecution, personal unhappiness, sickness, unemployment, injustice and lack of faith”, the prioress continues. The sisters help them wherever they can and also bring their cares and concerns before Almighty God, “with the certainty of being heard.” Again and again they see people who are on the edge of the abyss, and endeavour to put them back on their feet again – sometimes quite literally, with the help of their outpatient clinic and food kitchen.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

In order to complete the final stage, however, the sisters need one last slice of help. Quite recently, two Sisters had to be admitted to hospital, and the last reserves of cash were spent on operations for them. So it will not be possible to complete the final work on their convent without the generous support of our benefactors once more. ACN is proposing to help them with $13,210 CAN .

To make a donation to ACN for refugees

To make a donation by please call: (514) 932-0552 or toll free 1-(800) 585-6333
or click the image to make a secure on-line donation.

PHILIPPINES – One year later

07.11.2014 in ACN Canada, ACN International, Philippines, Reconstruction

ACN International

Adapted by Robert Lalonde

ACN-20140313-06044

©Aid to the Church in Need

On 8th November 2013, super typhoon Haiyan pounded the island of Leyte in the Philippines with winds nearing 315 kilometres per hour and a tremendous storm surge that bulldozed the countryside. 11 million people were affected by the storm. Over 6,000 people lost their lives.

The Minor Seminary of the Sacred Heart in Palo was almost totally destroyed. At that time, there were only four priests in the building: the rector, the vice-rector, the dean of the College of the Philosophy and the Prefect of Studies, Father Mark Ivo Velasquez. As the latter explains, there were no seminarians because they were gone on their annual retreat.

ACN-20140428-07958

©Aid to the Church in Need

Father Velasquez recalls the frightful events of that night: “I woke up at four, as did the other priests because we could not sleep and we wanted to monitor the progress of the storm. We were watching as the strength of the wind increased and I was becoming increasingly worried because I could see the roof of the chapel being lifted up little by little. One of the dorms there, the walls exploded. The pressure was so great that it pushed one door to the other dorm. The high school building was destroyed. The auditorium it was totally flattened in a matter of minutes. Our carpentry shop which is at the back, it was completely destroyed”.

The wind damaged 80% of the Seminary buildings. Several months after Haiyan made landfall, the seminary has resumed operations.

 

ACN helps kids go back to school

23.10.2014 in ACN Canada, ACN International, ACN PROJECTS, ACN SPECIAL SERIES, Iraq, Middle East, Refugees
All projects underway adding up to a total amount of 5.77 million CAN – one of the largest efforts in ACN’s history – shows the scale of the drama experienced by our Iraqi brothers and sisters.  If our partners recognize us for our support, we still know that they are far from the end of this unspeakable catastrophe. The threat remains and the fragility of their hearts no less persistent.
 
This is why we still your help to continue supporting our brothers and sisters of the Middle-East trapped and forced to seek refuge elsewhere in their country… if not in another.

Marie-Claude Lalonde, National Director

 


 

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

Iraq

ACN helps kids go back to school 

John Pontifex, ACN United Kingdom
Adapted by Amanda Bridget-Griffin

RANIA and Ranin are inseparable. The twins, who have just turned 10, both enjoy school or at least they did until they were forced to flee their homes as Islamic State forces advanced. We met Rania and Ranin and their mother Thirka, in Ankawa, outside the Kurdish capital, Erbil, where they are sharing a tent with other families in the compound of St Joseph’s Chaldean Church. It was early October when we saw them and Thirka was anxious about the start of the school year, which the twins and their brother, Habib, a year older, had already missed.

It is for children such as Ranin, Rania and Habib that Aid to the Church in Need has committed 2.9 million for schooling projects. Under the scheme, eight schools will be built: four in Ankawa and another four in the Dohuk province in the far north of Kurdish northern Iraq.

On our very first day in northern Iraq, Chaldean Archbishop Bashar Warda of Erbil proudly took us to see the new porta-cabin Mar Yamana School (St. Mary’s School) being developed in Ankawa. The school will provide for 900 children, classes divided into morning and afternoon rotations of 450 each, and next door a clinic is being created, run by the Ankawa-based Holy Cross Sisters so any medical needs they have can quickly be dealt with. With 120,000 Christians now descended on Kurdistan, there are teachers and others in the education profession among their number willing and able to join the staff, their salaries met by the government.

Greeted with news of the schools, Rania and Ranin’s mother is immediately enthusiastic. “Thank you for offering your kind support,” she says. Thirka, who dresses in black, continues to grieve her husband, a policeman in Qaraqosh, killed five years ago attending the scene of a bomb blast. “I was just beginning to cope with life without my husband,” says Thirka, “but being forced to leave our homes has made life impossible. “To have no school for the children to go to is a disaster. If they are to have any hope for the future, school is an absolute necessity.”

Irak-3


Aid to the Church in Need announces 12 urgent aid packages for Iraq to help the thousands of displaced Iraqi Christians. They are to receive food, shelter, schooling and gifts for children in a concerted emergency relief program rushed through by aCatholic charity before the onset of winter. The 4 million Euros scheme announced by Aid to the Church in Need – one of the largest in the charity’s 67-year history – also includes pastoral support for priests and Sisters displaced by the crisis that has swept the country.

Syria – An interview with Maronite Archbishop of Damascus, Samir Nassar

22.10.2014 in ACN International, ACN Interview, Syria
© Aid to the Church in Need

Archbishop Samir Nassar © Aid to the Church in Need

“You can die a number of ways in Damascus”

The Maronite Archbishop of Damascus, Samir Nassar, spoke to the international Catholic pastoral charity “Aid to the Church in Need” on life in Syria and the distress of its people

by Oliver Maksan, ACN International

Adapted by ACN Canada

Aid to the Church in Need: Your Excellency, the war in Syria has now lasted for more than three years. How are the people living in such a situation?

Problems are increasing. The economy is dead. The people have no work. Inflation is rising. Our currency is rapidly losing value against the dollar. Gradually everyone is becoming poor. People have used up their savings. They all need help. We as a Church are trying to support as many families as possible. At the present time this involves about 300-400 Christian families. The problem is getting the help to them. This isn’t without its dangers. It’s possible to get robbed or be abducted. But we have to take this risk. Otherwise our people will leave. We’ve already been forced to close down three parishes because the faithful have gone. So if we don’t help the few that remain, there’ll be no longer a Church in Damascus. Thank God that Aid to the Church in Need is there to help us in these difficult years.

Is the Syrian state still able to grant any assistance?

No. People have to rely on their own resources. But as I said, even those who are in work are becoming poor on account of the high inflation. But there is hardly any work. Elderly people are of course particularly badly affected. To date they have been supported by their families. But these no longer have anything. And so we are trying to take their place. We have a program which helps old people get their medications.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

How should we imagine the day-to-day life in a war zone?

Well, we are now in the fourth year of the war. In the beginning everybody was afraid of the fighting, the bombs and the missiles. Now we’ve got used to it. Life must go on. Of course we try to be very careful. It’s better to stay at home than to be on the street. You can die a number of ways in Damascus. For instance, you can be shot by a sniper or blown up by car bombs. And of course there are the shells. And then again you can die from lack of medications if you are injured. The hospitals no longer have sufficient supplies of medicines. One shell can kill three or four people immediately on impact and perhaps injure thirty or forty others. As a result ten more will die because they do not receive adequate medical attention. And of course you can also die of malnutrition. If you are a diabetic, for example, and need a certain diet, but don’t get it, you will also die early. And the living conditions are also poor in other ways. We have two million children who no longer go to school. Many schools have been destroyed. And the ones that are left are completely overcrowded. In each classroom they now have around sixty pupils. This determines the level accordingly.

What is the situation regarding the food supply? Is it possible to buy things if you have money, or is there simply nothing?

You can indeed buy things, especially canned goods. But what’s lacking is fresh foodstuffs, like vegetables, cheese and meat. The problem is also that you have to keep fresh food in cold storage because of the heat. But unfortunately we have problems with the power supply. And so we eat mainly canned products and non-perishables such as rice or lentils.

Do you have the impression that the war and the distress have deepened the faith of your flock?

Yes. There is a return to the faith. People are praying a lot more. The churches stay open longer. Many of the faithful go there to pray in silence, often for hours on end. They have nothing left but their faith. They are in a dead-end and are waiting for death. At the end of mass they say goodbye because they don’t know whether they will see one another the next day. The mood is very resigned. People surrender to their fate. So it’s a very difficult situation. We as a Church are at the moment doing less pastoral work and primarily social work, and we are trying to alleviate the people’s distress. That is all they have at present. There is no other help available. The family is basically the only intact institution. It’s the family which helps, shares and supports. Identity with the family is very pronounced. Without the family it would be a total disaster.

Do you have any figures regarding those of your faithful who have left Syria?

No. We don’t have any statistics. But we notice how the number of people taking the sacrament is falling from year to year, and very sharply too. In 2012 there were more baptisms and weddings than in 2013. The number of funerals, on the other hand, is rising. We now have to enlarge our cemetery. Previously we had projects for a kindergarten or a school, but now we are planning enlargement of the Christian cemetery.

© Aid to the Church in Need

© Aid to the Church in Need

 

Since the war began, in March 2011, ACN has provided a total of approximately 5.92 million CAD in aid for the people of Syria and for the Syrian refugees in the neighbouring countries. In 2014 alone, the charity supplied a total of $1,762, 530 CAD in emergency aid for the war victims and refugees of Syria.

To make a donation to ACN for refugees

To make a donation by please call: (514) 932-0552 or toll free 1-(800) 585-6333
or click the image to make a secure on-line donation.